Thursday, July 28, 2011

Why short projects are part of agile business intelligence

One of the key ideas in agility is the importance of delivering real, testable results without delay. In fact, the Agile Manifesto recommends delivering working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months.

Delivery working software with two months may sound a bit extreme, but there is good evidence that short projects are more successful than long projects. In fact, our research in the BI Survey shows that the application should be rolled out to the users less than six months after the product has been selected. We have found the same result year after year in the ten year history of the Survey. Amazingly, project benefits start to fall as early as a month after the product is selected, and continue to fall thereafter. And of the many project parameters we study, none shows as clear an effect on project success as project length.

These results from the BI Survey provide clear empirical support for the idea of using agile methods in business intelligence projects. The results have remained also consistent since we started the Survey ten years ago, long before the idea of agile development or agile business intelligence became popular.

But why do short projects work so much better? Our research shows that the main problems that arise in longer projects are organizational, not technical. Needs change over the course of time, and end users lose interest in the project. Disagreements over the project goals arise. Lack of interest and disappointed end users are a major issue in business intelligence.

And needs certainly do change quickly in business intelligence. For example, another study we carried out shows that three quarters of European companies modify their planning processes one or more times a year. In an environment like this, a project that takes a year to implement is quite likely to be obsolete before it is finished. Even a six month wait can push potential users to look around for a more agile solution.

The problem this creates is that not all business intelligence projects can be carried out within a few months. This is especially true when major data management issues need to be addressed. The agile solution to this is to find way of splitting large projects into smaller ones. The usual argument against this approach is that it creates the risk of reducing efficiency in the long term. But the agile methodology is to measure success in terms of working software delivered in the short term, instead of attempting to meet nebulous long-term goals.

1 comment:

yadhav said...

interesting blog. It would be great if you can provide more details about it. Thanks you













Agile Project Management

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